16
Nov

MEXICO CITY — On September 19, Mexico´s ground was shaken once again, as it had been in 1985. Thirty-two years after the September 19, 1985 earthquake, buildings were once again turned to ashes, blackouts began, streets were destroyed and bridges fell. Hundreds of lives were taken away and thousands were displaced or left homeless, but citizens acted in unison to rebuilt their homeland. “The Mexico that I saw this week is not a Mexico that crosses arms, is not a country asleep, it is not an indifferent society,” said Elsy Reyes, a student in Puebla, where the earthquake’s magnitude hit 7.1.

Minutes after the ground stopped shaking, civilians began using social media to organize help for victims of the earthquake in Mexico. Women and men of all ages and social status volunteered to move rubble. Doctors, veterinarians and nurses worked day and night for free; and hospital and clinics gave free services.

“From the girl who, without knowing me, took me to her house at midnight to go to a clean bathroom, to those who put themselves at risk several times to save a life — they made me realize that together we make a huge difference. I am very proud of my country,” Reyes said. Read more

By Isa Barquin on November 1, 2017
IE Bachelor in International Relations 2nd Year Student
Published in http://www.borgenmagazine.com

15
Nov

On Friday last week, Catalonia declared its independence, after the Spanish government triggered article 155 of the constitution, allowing the central government to impose direct rule on Catalonia, which has been an autonomous region since 1978.

In mid-October the military forces of the central government of Iraq retook Kirkuk from the Peshmerga forces. Kurdish aspirations for independence hinged on the city and its oil reserves, as it would have provided the economic resources for an economically self-sufficient entity.

As the 15th anniversary of the March 2003 Iraq war approaches events in Kirkuk are more important than ever, a reminder that post-Saddam Iraq continues to teeter on the edge of failure.

In pondering how this crisis emerged in Iraq, it is useful to compare why a similar crisis is occurring in Spain. Both the KRG and Catalonia have experienced past trauma in the guise of Saddam Hussein and General Francisco Franco. Independence in the minds of nationalists seeks to break with this past trauma. Read more…

Published in https://www.trtworld.com/

Ibrahim al-Marashi is an associate professor at the Department of History, California State University, San Marcos. He is the co-author of The Modern History of Iraq, 4th edition.

3
Nov

As new technologies subject the world’s economies to massive structural change, wages are no longer playing the central redistributive role they once did. Unless the decoupling of productivity and wages is addressed, the political convulsions many countries are experiencing will only intensify.

MADRID – Macroeconomic data from the world’s advanced economies can be mystifying when viewed in isolation. But when analyzed collectively, the data reveal a troubling truth: without changes to how wealth is generated and distributed, the political convulsions that have swept the world in recent years will only intensify.

Consider, for example, wages and employment. In the United States and many European countries, average salaries have stagnated, despite most economies having recovered from the 2008 financial crisis in terms of GDP and job growth.

Moreover, increases in employment have not led to a slowdown or a reversal of the decline in the wage share of total national income. On the contrary, most of the wealth created since the 2008 crisis has gone to the rich. This might explain the low levels of consumption that characterize most advanced economies, and the failure of extremely lax monetary policy to produce an uptick in inflation.

Employment, too, seems to be performing in anomalous ways. Job creation, where it has taken place, has followed a different path than history suggests it should. For example, most employment growth has been in high-skill or low-skill occupations, hollowing out the middle. Many of the people who once comprised the Western middle class are now part of the middle-lower and lower classes, and live more economically precarious lives than ever before. Read more…
Published on Oct. 25, 2017 in https://www.project-syndicate.org

Manuel Muñiz
Manuel Muñiz is Dean of IE School of International Relations and Senior Associate at Harvard University’s Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs.

2
Nov

The Fourth Sector Is Here to Stay

By Alejandro Erquicia, MIR 2017/2018 Student

Organizations today are more aware than ever of society’s demands and are adapting, at different speeds, to the changing context of our time. The level of interconnectivity the world has reached is such that citizens demand change. Society wants progress and knows that to resolve these issues we need organizations to abide by social principles while doing business. In such an environment, the Fourth Sector, mission driven for profit organizations, is expanding its reach and establishing itself as the way to do business in the years to come.

A deep dive into the unstoppable growth of the Fourth Sector was presented to all of IE academia by the Center for the Governance of Change, a research institution aimed at deepening our understanding of change and developing strategies to anticipate, govern and promote progress. The School of International Relations at IE University was presenting the initiative as one of its core areas of work. In a roundtable entitled The Fourth Sector & the Future of Social Entrepreneurship panelists shared some practices and experiences on these types of businesses. The conversation was of great interest for students and professors of the Schools of Business, Law and International Relations.

The Fourth Sector, which has moved beyond the antiquated three sector system of government, private sector and non for profit, addresses societal challenges blending the three sectors. It is not driven by profit maximization but conducts business, in all types of industries, with a purpose to make the world a better place. The key factors are that like non-profits, their primary purpose is to advance societal benefit and, like for-profits, they generate a substantial portion of their income from business activities.

There are indications that it could account for as much as 10% of GDP as well as nearly twice the job growth rate as traditional for-profit businesses in the US and Europe, said Heerad Sabeti, head of the World Economic Forum’s Fourth Sector Development Initiative during his intervention. He defended the job creation implications the Fourth Sector could reach and encouraged the furthering of the new system of operating which lies at intersection of the three traditional sectors.
On his behalf Sebastián Gatica, professor in Social Innovation at the Universidad Católica de Chile spoke about the need to further develop a supportive and conductive ecosystem from which the fourth sector could exponentially increase its presence since it’s an approach to see the future, and the world for generations to come, in a positive way. Alejandro Pachecho, Strategic Adviser at the United Nations Development Programme and Antonio Vives, Adjunct Professor at Stanford University, also shared their insights and discussed the challenges and opportunities of this new sector.

The Fourth Sector is a new international project supported by the World Economic Forum (WEF), the Ibero-American General Secretariat (SEGIB), and the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), that seeks to accelerate the establishment of a tailor-made ecosystem for social economy and for-benefit enterprises across borders. IE University will act as an academic partner in the project.

The Fourth Sector is here to stay. Businesses are transforming and can’t solely concentrate on Corporate Social Responsibility. More is needed and by focusing on the combination of doing good for the planet and having that approach to tackle the challenges we have, the social and economic returns will be noticed by all across the board.

Before closing the session Diego Rubio, Executive Director of the Center for the Governance of Change raised a question that surely left all thinking. If you were to receive two job offers, one working in the Amazon forest on tree preservation and the other working for a tobacco multinational in the US that paid five times more, which one would you take? Food for thought.

24
Oct

Meet the Dean: Manuel Muñiz and the state of International Relations

BY Alejandro Erquicia, MIR Student 2017/2018
Oct. 16th, 2017

The puzzling events taking place in international relations are being driven by greater underlying themes represented by twin forces: technological change and globalization. Great economic prosperity, as never before, coupled with a vanishing social contract lies at the heart of the global commotion of these times. Such a context is being propelled by changes in technology that in turn directly impact the labor market and boost inequality.
In the middle of October, as the new academic year at the IE School of International Relations enters in full swing, Dean Manuel Muñiz invited students from the Masters (MIR) and Bachelor program for a presentation on some of the issues that the School is focusing on and are the pulse of global policy and international economy. These themes, and others, are already sparking debates in the lectures at the MIR, as they are omnipresent. No doubt they will be a main source of discussion in the months to come.
The global context in these times of rapid change is a world evolving around political upheaval and abundant contradictions in the economy which feed off each other. Widespread protest votes are mainstream – Germany and Austria being the most recent examples. The combination of the stagnation of income of the middle class, growing inequality and a radicalization of politics are three main pillars of today’s global scenario.
As Manuel Muñiz put it, “there is an economic argument to the political upheaval.” For example, “since the 1970s advanced economies have seen a strong productivity increases and stagnant labor income. This is a major breach of our social contract,” said the Dean to all international students who gathered in María de Molina, in the heart of Madrid. “From 1973 to 2013 productivity of goods and services in the US grew by over 240% while labor wages remained stagnant,” he mentioned as another example of the moment we are in.
Manuel, who obtained his analysis from strong economic data and used graphs to support his argument during the entire presentation, is the founding director of IE University’s Center for the Governance of Change, studying the above mentioned challenges and other changes in the public and private sector. Among the solutions and frameworks the Center is covering to manage these challenges is the proposition of a new social contract, including a transformation of the sources of income of the state and a new redistribution tool, as well as the needed change in role of the private sector.
The need to understand, analyze and explain such forces of change are key for the future of international relations. The transformation is here to stay and the complexity of the global vectors of action will only grow deeper and wider hence the socioeconomic conditions that we are able to improve today will be beneficial for generations to come.

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