23
Aug

The month of August always brings its share of seasonal distractions: last-minute vacations, the Olympic games in Rio, warm days that distract us from less calm parts of the world.

But those summer indulgences can sometimes divert our attention from serious problems. In this case, that means rising tensions in a part of the world that not only drives the global economy but is bringing some of the world’s most powerful nations closer towards outright conflict—a conflict that would make the Islamic State, Ukraine, and even the unending civil war in Syria seem small by comparison.

What am I talking about? The seemingly endless dance of danger between China and the United States over the South China Sea, a body of water that carries over $5.3 trillion in seaborne trade ($1.2 trillion of American goods, by the way).

And for those who have been watching this slowly brewing crisis, it appears the stage is being set for a crisis, one that could come later in the summer and early fall thanks to a combination of factors. Read more…

Harry J. Kazianis is a senior fellow for defense policy at the Center for the National Interest and senior editor at the National Interest Magazine. You can follow him on Twitter: @grecianformula.

Aug. 17th, www.foreignpolicy.org

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