Archive for the ‘News’ Category

10
Aug

Nato’s challenge from within

Written on August 10, 2015 by Waya Quiviger in News, Security

At the 1949 signing ceremony for the Washington Treaty that created NATO, a band played show tune selections from George Gershwin’s Porgy and Bess, including “I Got Plenty O’ Nuttin’” and “It Ain’t Necessarily So.”Article 5 of the Washington Treaty, what NATO itself calls the cornerstone of the alliance, commits members to come to each other’s defense. Sixty-six years after NATO’s creation, a recent Pew Research Center survey of people in nine NATO nations, representing the lion’s share of NATO defense spending, suggests public commitment to Article 5 “ain’t necessarily so.”At a time of tensions with Russia not seen since the Cold War, many publics in the Western alliance are divided in their support for a potential military confrontation with Moscow over its territorial ambitions. To paraphrase Winston Churchill, NATO’s challenges are now not just “from Stettin in the Baltic to Trieste in the Adriatic,” but at home.

Read more…

Published on August 6th by Bruce Stokes in foreign policy.com

14
Jul

The historic deal between Iran and world powers reportedly reached on July 14 in Vienna has paved the way for international sanctions against Tehran to be lifted in exchange for limits on its nuclear activities. While the six powers have said the deal will slow Tehran’s ability to acquire a nuclear weapon, the accord could also have other far-reaching ramifications linked to Iran’s possible reintegration into the global community.

From potentially stoking a Middle East arms race, to enabling political reforms in Iran, to undercutting Russia’s energy might by freeing up massive oil and gas supplies, here are some possible implications of the agreement.

‘Destabilizing’ Factor?

The prospect of a prospering Iran has sparked concern among skeptics of the nuclear deal — and even some U.S. officials who back it — that Tehran could use this financial windfall to destabilize the already volatile Middle East.Sanctions relief could allow Iran to repatriate more than $100 billion in oil revenues currently frozen overseas , and some experts estimate that sanctions relief could help Iran’s $420 billion economy grow by 5 percent to 8 percent annually.

“We are, of course, aware and concerned that, despite the massive domestic spending needs facing Iran, some of the resulting sanctions relief could be used by Iran to fund destabilizing actions,” The Daily Beast quoted a U.S. State Department official as saying in a July 8 report. 

However, Mohsen Milani, the executive director of the Center for Strategic & Diplomatic Studies at the University of South Florida, told RFE/RL that the deal could be a “transformative event” in the Middle East because it opens the door to better ties between Iran and the West, which could reduce tension in the region.

Richard Nephew, who served as the State Department’s principal deputy coordinator for sanctions policy and as director for Iran at the National Security Council, argues that fears that Iran will use money from sanctions relief to bankroll its regional ambitions are overblown.

“Iran’s domestic economic needs are real, as is [President Hassan Rohani’s] imperative to deliver on the promises that got him elected,” Nephew wrote earlier this month. “To ensure the stability of their government, Iran’s leaders must tend to the problems at home and make the investments necessary to sustain their future. Supporting Syrian President Bashar al-Assad and other regional actors is an important, but secondary, objective.” 

Shifting Alliances

The U.S. push for the nuclear deal with Iran has also raised fears among Sunni-dominated Arab states that Washington, their traditional guarantor, is essentially stepping back to allow Shi’ite Iran free rein in the region. Amid these concerns, Gulf Arab states are increasingly talking about diversifying their international alliances.

“[U.S. President Barack] Obama is going to be remembered as the U.S. president who restored relations with Iran. But he may also be remembered as the U.S. president who lost his traditional allies in the region,” Sami al-Faraj, a Kuwaiti security adviser to the Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC), told Reuters in June. Read more…

Written by By Carl Schreck and Golnaz Esfandiari

Published on July 14th in http://www.rferl.org/

30
Jun

IE Story: the new blog!

Written on June 30, 2015 by Waya Quiviger in News

IE STORYThe IE Story webpage provides a range of information on the history of IE since it first opened in 1973, including major milestones, the evolution of our master and executive education program portfolio, the growth in the number of students and nationalities on campus, and IE’s recognition of key players from the world of business and economy. The site also offers information on IE’s presence worldwide, a photo gallery, and comments from the people who have played a key role in IE’s development, looking back over 40 years of history and forward to the challenges that lay ahead. IE Story

 

18
Jun

IML_2269On June 17th Dr. Arantza de Areilza, Dean of IE School of International Relations, interviewed Former Prime Minister of the United Kingdom and current United Nations Special Envoy for Global Education, Gordon Brown, at the Management & Business Summit (MABS) organized by Atresmedia.

From the uncertain future of the UK in the EU and the Union itself to the goal of achieving quality, relevance, and inclusive education for every child, Gordon Brown focused his intervention on the current and future global challenges. “We live in an interdependent world. For example, the fear of ‘Grexit’ and the demands for debt reduction in Greece have implications all over Europe. As Europe we need to think more globally”, Mr. Brown said.

IML_2040During his interview with Dr. de Areilza, Mr. Brown highlighted in his speech that the world is experiencing seismic changes, or revolutions, as he named them. As a case in point, in the run up to the 2000s financial crisis the world economic center was located in the West, but in the last decade we have witnessed a shift to the emerging markets in Asia, Latin America, and Africa.

Another revolution that will have a huge impact on the future is the rise of a new global middle class, particularly in Asia and Africa. As Mr. Brown pointed out, the global middle class would expand from around 20 percent of world’s population now to approximately 50 percent in 2030. This means that only those companies who adapt quickly to these changes will survive.

IML_2320As the UN Special Envoy for Global Education, Gordon Brown also discussed the need to tackle major inequalities among education systems worldwide. “To this end we need a revolution in the way we educate our children and more investment on education”, Mr. Brown argued. “We can at least become the first generation in History where every child has the right to go to school”.

For all these challenges, though, “the world ahead is a world of opportunities in which the most innovative people, companies, and countries will have a clear advantage and will be more likely to succeed”, Mr. Brown concluded.

 

 

 For more videos and interviews subscribe to the IE School of International Relations Youtube Channel!

11
Jun

The Other Photo: David Moshfegh

Written on June 11, 2015 by Waya Quiviger in Master in International Relations (MIR), News

IE School of International Relations professor David Moshfegh recently sat down with IE’s Communication Department for a 10 question Q&A session. Check out the full interview here.

david_moshfegh_v1_english_web

 

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