Archive for the ‘Europe’ Category

21
May

Spain&EUEl próximo lunes 25 de mayo, tendrá lugar el seminario “Diálogo sobre 30 años de España en la UE” en el aula E-001 (C/ María de Molina 4) de 14h30 a 16h00, después de un bufé frío que se servirá de 14h00 a 14h30.

Este seminario, organizado por el Centro de Estudios Europeos/IE, es el primero del programa “España: ¿Un actor clave en las instituciones europeas? 30 años de pertenencia a la Unión Europea” patrocinado por el programa “Hablamos de Europa” del Ministerio de Asunto Exteriores que se impartirá desde mayo hasta septiembre de 2015.

Los dos ponentes son Charles Powell, Director del Real Instituto Elcano y José Ignacio Torreblanca, Director de la oficina de Madrid del ECFR, quienes establecerán un balance de la posición de España en la Unión Europea desde una perspectiva histórica y a la luz de la situación actual.

Se ruega confirmación a cee@ie.edu

Charles Powell, Licenciado en Historia y Literatura y Doctor en Historia por la Universidad de Oxford, es actualmente director del Real Instituto Elcano.  Entre sus numerosas publicaciones sobre temas internacionales destacan: ‘El amigo americano. España y EEUU de la dictadura a la democracia’ (Galaxia Gutenberg, 2011); ‘España en Europa, Europa en España’, en Emilio Lamo de Espinosa (coord.), ‘Europa después de Europa’ (Academia Europea de Ciencias y Artes, 2010); y ‘Las democracias occidentales frente al terrorismo global’, coeditado con Fernando Reinares (Editorial Ariel, 2008).

José Ignacio Torreblanca es profesor de Ciencia Política en la UNED, director de la oficina en Madrid del European Council on Foreign Relations y columnista de EL PAIS desde junio de 2008. Sus áreas de especialización son los asuntos internos de la UE, principalmente el auge del populismo y el euroescepticismo, las reformas institucionales y la política de ampliación y de vecindad. Sus últimos libros en español son Asaltar los cielos (2015), ¿Quién gobierna en Europa?: reconstruir la democracia, recuperar a la ciudadanía (2014) y La fragmentación del poder europeo (2011).

25
Apr

A Dialogue with European Commissioner Lord Jonathan Hill

We are pleased to invite you to meet Lord Jonathan Hill – European Commissioner for Financial Stability, Financial Services and Capital Markets Union.

Commissioner Hill will talk about the European Commission’s priority of restoring jobs and growth in Europe and the role of banks and capital markets in financing the economy. He will present the main features of the Commission’s Capital Markets Union currently under consultation. Lord Hill will speak about the role of finance and the importance of risk-taking and an entrepreneurial attitude.

Limited seats. Confirmation of attendance is necessary through the following link: https://clubs.ie.edu/iecampuslife/rsvp?id=200002472

You can also attend through videoconference: http://meet.ie.edu/titansoffinance-lordhill/

Monday, May 4, 1:00pm – 2:00pm

S-001/S-002, c/Serrano 105, Madrid 28006, Spain

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Lord Jonathan Hill
European Commission
European Commissioner for Financial Stability, Financial Services and Capital Markets Union

12
Mar

Written by Meghan O´Farrell, IE Master in International Relations student, 2014/2015 Intake 

foto grupo

A handful of students represented IE on Friday, February 27th during a debate with the Vice-President of the European Commission, Jyrki Katainen, the Spanish Minister of Economy and Competitiveness, Luis de Guindos, and Pablo Zalba, Member of the European Parliament for the Group of the European People’s Party.

Vice-President Katainen debate_pics (6)At a rather critical moment for the EU in the wake of the financial crisis, 50 students convened from several universities to listen to Vice President Katainen, responsible for Jobs, Growth, Investment and Competitiveness, elaborate on President Juncker’s investment plan. The idea is to close the massive investment gap (€434 billion fall from 2007) crippling Europe’s employment and long-term growth. The Commission has chosen as its plan of attack a trifecta consisting of the mobilization of public and private funds, a transparent pipeline to identify viable investment projects, and the removal of sector specific and other financial barriers to investment in hopes to improve the overall business environment.

Still having not recovered from the financial crisis, Vice President Katainen reinforced the importance of this plan at a time of devastating and stubborn unemployment figures across much of Europe and concerning levels of economic inequality among Member States. But its enforcement cannot only be top-down, said Mr. Katainen. He emphasized the role of each EU country assuming national responsibility and personal accountability in upholding the plan and doing its part to contribute to overall growth and investment. Together, he says, the EU can raise €300 billion over the next 3 years in additional public and private investment by supporting local businesses, upgrading transport, funding broadband in low density areas, and expanding R&D.

Vice President Katainen admits the lack of demand is indeed a real problem for Europe, but bolstering confidence among its citizens in financial institutions again is key. Whether it be Greek debt, Spanish unemployment, or the host of other challenges facing EU Member States, Mr. Katainen calls for increased financial, political, and social integration to overcome them. With the unprecedented degree of integration that Europe has achieved comes unprecedented cooperation, cohesion, and solidarity. Only with one voice, says Mr. Katainen, can the EU reach a truly influential role in the world.

 

You can watch the full video of the debate here (in English and Spanish): http://www.ec.nirestream.com/

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IE Students representing IE during the debate with the Vice-President of the European Commission, Jyrki Katainen, at the Representation of the European Commission in Spain.

10
Mar

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On March 6th IE hosted Cecilia Malmström, European Commissioner for Trade, who examined the challenges facing EU trade policy with students and professors of IE University’s Bachelor and Master in International Relations. The EU Commissioner was received by the President of IE, Diego del Alcázar, and Arantza de Areilza, Dean of IE School of International Relations.

The talk formed part of a series of initiatives launched by the European Commission aimed at informing citizens about advances in negotiations on international trade agreements, such as the Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP), and to hear opinions from different collectives on EU policy issues. Commissioner Malmström and her team are heading European negotiations related to the TTIP, an agreement aimed at enabling free trade with the US.

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Malmström explained how one of the EU’s key challenges is that of “connecting with citizens”, listening to their opinions, and debating with them on European policy.  She recognized that there is a major debate surrounding the TTIP negotiations, the completion of which would have a very positive impact in terms of job creation. Malmström reminded those present that 30 million people in Europe work in positions related to export, 4.5 million of which have a direct connection with exports to the US. She explained how Swedish policy has centered around the idea that trade agreements are not only aimed at large companies, but at smaller firms as well, pointing out that in Spain alone there are 70,000 SMEs that export.

The European Commissioner for Trade underscored the fact that the signing of the TTIP agreement does not mean that consumers will have less protection or will face a change in regulations. She explained that the agreement is about providing European firms with greater access to the US market, citing as an example how the safety tests to which the US and European automobile industries are subjected to when exporting from one region to another are of a similar, very high standard, which is a major cause of inefficiency in the sector.

Participating IE University students were able to exchange views on key subjects with Cecilia Malmström, including European trade policy, and the main agreements currently being negotiated in the Asia-Pacific region, Latin America and Africa, as well as reflecting on the challenges facing the EU in this field in the coming years.

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Cecilia Malmström, European Commissioner for Trade, is interviewed by Arantza de Areilza, Dean of IE School of International Relations, on the Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP) and Europe-US Relationship.

23
Feb

A Greek deal cannot fix the flaws in the euro – Gideon Rachman (FT)

Written on February 23, 2015 by Waya Quiviger in Europe

Gideon Rachman – Financial Times

euWatching the Greek crisis unfold, I found myself torn between two equal and opposite thoughts. First, the euro cannot survive. Second, everything must be done to save the euro.

The agreement reached between Greece and its eurozone creditors is therefore a good thing because it has put off the immediate threat of a political and economic crisis. But experience suggests that a debt deal with Greece may be only marginally more durable than a ceasefire in Ukraine. In both cases, there are underlying tensions and problems that cannot be solved by a cleverly drafted document.

There has rarely been a period when it is more urgent for Europeans to work together. Read more.

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