Archive for the ‘Globalization & International Trade’ Category

17
Feb

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On March 6th IE will host Ms. Cecilia Malmström, European Commissioner for Trade, for a discussion with our students and faculty on the much debated Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP), and the trade agenda and priorities of Europe.

Since assuming office in November 2014 as the new Commissioner for Trade under the Juncker Commission Ms. Malmström has been leading the negotiations of the TTIP with the objective of reaching a balanced and reasonable agreement with the U.S. that respects Europe’s safety, health, social and data protection standards, and Europe’s cultural diversity.

Previously, Ms. Malmström served as European Commissioner for Home Affairs (2010-2014) and as Minister for EU Affairs in the Swedish Government (2006-2010). She was Vice-President of Folkpartiet (Swedish Liberal Party) from 2007 to 2010, Member of Folkpartiet Party Executive (2001-2010), and Member of the European Parliament (1999-2006).

For more information on the Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP) please visit this LINK.

 

The event will take place from 1.00pm to 2:30pm (Room S-105, Calle Serrano 105). Please, register here: https://clubs.ie.edu/iecampuslife/rsvp?id=200001878

10
Dec

On December 4th, the IE School of International Relations welcomed Marcos Troyjo, co-founder and co-director of BRICLab at Columbia University, who discussed with MIR students the coming of Reglobalization and its impact on reemerging markets.

According to Mr. Troyjo, if we were sent 25 years back in time and had to identify four main trends that defined International Relations, he would highlight the following:

Marcos Troyjo 2

  1. The idea that a combination of free markets and representative democracy represents a superior model in History, a sort of natural law to bring about prosperity.
  2. The dramatic shift of the world economic center from the West to the East illustrated by the influential role of Japan and the rise of the so-called Asian Tigers.
  3. The notion that innovation is about the capacity of big corporations to reinvent themselves.
  4. A deep conviction that political, economic and legal integration is the way forward for regional integration and ultimately for establishing a global government.

Read more…

28
Nov

Is the state making a comeback? It can certainly look like it. Old-fashioned interstate conflicts are roiling the China Sea and Russia’s western borders. Inter-governmental meetings such as the last Apec conference and the Group of 20 leading economies in Sydney took on an unwonted urgency. More positively, it is old-fashioned diplomacy that is making the running on issues from Iran’s nuclear programme to global warming.

Yet the dominant view since the early 1990s has been that globalisation meant the transformation of the world through non-state actors. The end of the cold war ushered in an almost Marxist expectation that the state would wither away – overshadowed by free flows of money and goods, undermined by non-state actors of which terrorist groups were only the most obvious. It was an expectation shared right across the political spectrum.

On the left, critics of market globalisation anticipated the rise of people power. Non-governmental organisations would supersede the supposedly worn out institutions of the nation state and create new, more vibrant forms of political activity. Technology would bring better solutions to old problems, bypassing stagnant state institutions.

The neoliberal right hailed the rise of global finance, the dismantling of capital controls and the deregulation of banking, not least because all of these weakened national governments’ capacity to control markets. In manufacturing and services, enormous new powers accrued to corporations able to take advantage of differing tax regimes and wage levels across the world.

Yet these hopes underestimated the sheer staying power – indeed the legitimacy – of the state and its institutions, and the extreme difficulty of creating new ones from scratch. NGOs remain on the sidelines: international organisations are vehicles for clusters and coalitions of national states to act in concert where they can. To that extent they are essentially derivative, reflecting the wishes of their most powerful members. The idea that they could be freed from the clutches of national governments was a pipe dream. Read more…

 

Published in the Financial Times on 26 November by Mark Mazower.

The writer is professor of history at Columbia and author of ‘Governing the World: The History of an Idea’

11
Nov

The annual APEC summit is underway in Beijing. Perhaps the most notable absentee is India’s Prime Minister Narendra Modi, who received an unprecedented invitation in July from Chinese President Xi Jinping to attend the gathering. Despite growing to become the world’s third largest economy in PPP terms, India is not a member of APEC, and as a result would not normally attend the summit. But this year President Xi used his platform as the summit host to extend invitations to non-members India, Pakistan, and Mongolia. While Pakistan and Mongolia’s leaders made the trip to Beijing for APEC, Prime Minister Modi decided not to do so. It’s a missed opportunity for India’s economic diplomacy at a time it could use a boost. For India, APEC, a grouping of twenty-one member economies across the Asia-Pacific region, has a complicated history on the membership front. Due to a moratorium that ran from 1998 through 2010, the forum did not consider any aspirants for membership during years of strong global economic growth. Following the expiration of the moratorium, APEC discussions on membership appear to be stuck in endless deliberation over regional balance and representation from sub-geographical areas within the forum. The result: in 2014, once again there are no moves to induct new member economies.

Read more…

20
Oct

Arancha GonzalezArancha Gonzalez (7)

Arancha González, Executive Director of the International Trade Centre (ITC), addressed the MIR class on Thursday 16 October. Ms. González gave an insightful lecture on “Global Governance, International Trade Trends and Geopolitics” that was followed by Q&A from the audience and a lively discussion with the participation of Mr. Guillermo de la Dehesa, Chairman of the International Advisory Board of IE Business School.

Read more…

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