Archive for the ‘Topics’ Category


Last month the IE Master in International Relations Academic Director and Professor, Daniel Kselman, travelled to Washington D.C. where he gave a Master Class on democracy, prosperity, and economic growth, showing the interconnection between each as well as the practical importance in modern societies.

Professor Kselman showed this through real life examples charting the relationship between political freedom at the national level and its link with economic performance, indicating pluralism as the key factor. He then looked at how policy makers can use this information going forward when looking to create more open and democratic societies.

While professor Kselman did make note to point out the positive implications of this research, he also cautioned that governments and international funding arms such as the IMF and the World Bank should be careful of how and more importantly to whom they allocate their resources, posturing that pluralism should be their main indicator when faced with these decisions.

The event was preceded by admissions events related to IE´s Master in International Relations program and was followed by a networking cocktail with interested students, alumni, and professors.

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Chers Membres de la Communauté IE,

Au nom de toute notre institution, je voudrais exprimer notre profonde solidarité avec nos amis Français en ces moments d’intense tristesse. Nous condamnons le terrorisme sous toutes ses formes et resterons fermes et unis face à ceux qui menacent nos valeurs. Aujourd’hui nous nous sentons tous Parisiens et nous envoyons nos sincères condoléances à tous ceux qui souffrent les effets de ces attaques barbares.

Avec mes salutations les plus chaleureuses,
Arantza de Areilza
IE School of International Relations

Dear Members of the IE Community,

On behalf of us all, I would like to express our deepest solidarity with our French friends in these moments of profound sorrow. We condemn all forms of terrorism and will stand firm and united against those who challenge our most cherished social values. We all feel Parisians today and would like to extend our deepest condolences to those who are suffering the effects of these barbaric attacks.

With my warmest regards,
Arantza de Areilza
IE School of International Relations

Queridos Miembros de la Comunidad del IE,

En nombre de todos, quiero expresar nuestra solidaridad con nuestros amigos Franceses en estos momentos de profundo pesar. Condenamos todas las formas de terrorismo y seremos firmes frente a aquéllos que ponen en peligro nuestros valores sociales más queridos. Todos nos sentimos Parisinos hoy y enviamos nuestra condolencia más sentida a todos los que sufren los efectos de estos ataques bárbaros.

Con todo cariño,
Arantza de Areilza
IE School of International Relations


A new era in Myanmar

Written on November 13, 2015 by Waya Quiviger in Asia, Democracy & Human Rights

FOR once the headline of the Global New Light of Myanmar, the rag that churns out the paranoid delusions of Myanmar’s ruling generals, told the real story: “Dawn of a New Era”. Even before a final result is declared, it is plain that the National League for Democracy (NLD), led by Aung San Suu Kyi, a Nobel peace-prize winner, has won by a landslide in Myanmar’s first free, but far from fair, election in 25 years.

The NLD seems likely to have won enough seats to secure a majority—even with a quarter of the parliamentary seats reserved for the army. That is a remarkable victory for Miss Suu Kyi, a vindication of her policy of compromise with the generals and a repudiation of decades of military rule (see article). One of Asia’s most isolated and brutal dictatorships may thus be setting a democratic example to an ever more autocratic neighbourhood: in recent years Thailand has suffered a military coup (again), China and Vietnam have been locking up more dissenters and bloggers than ever and Malaysia’s government has clung to power only through rigged elections.

Amid the euphoria though, there is a nagging fear that Myanmar’s generals will seek to frustrate the people’s will. The early signs are that they will not do so blatantly, as they did when they ignored Miss Suu Kyi’s last general-election success in 1990. But apart from their parliamentary block, the generals retain control of the army, police and key ministries as well as much of the civil service. The army-inspired constitution ensures that Miss Suu Kyi cannot become president. Read more…

Published on Nov. 13 in the Economist




According to conventional wisdom, states in the twenty-first century inhabit a fundamentally liberal world order. And while the current international order certainly has its discontents, most in the West like to believe that most of the world accepts liberal principles as desirable ways of organizing international affairs. Current events, however, highlight the extent to which this conventional wisdom is wishful thinking: international order is not an agreed-upon set of international compacts, but rather the site of vigorous political contestation, and the survival of its liberal character can hardly be taken for granted.

Europe and the United States are the architects and stewards of the rules, norms and institutions that together comprise what is commonly referred to as the liberal international order. The liberal order-building project can be said to have started during the age of Pax Britannica, when the world’s leading great powers—the European empires plus the United States, Japan and, to a lesser extent, the Ottomans—gradually came to routinize certain aspects of their relations with one another. Growing free trade, an expanded corpus of public international law, the use of binding arbitration as a mechanism for settling interstate disputes, formalized institutions and agreements to regulate commerce, communications and the process of colonization—all of these international developments can be considered germs of the present liberal order.

Read more…

Published by Peter Harris in the National Interest on November 10, 2015.


Composite image of China's President Xi Jinping and Taiwanese President Ma Ying-jeou

This weekend’s historic summit in Singapore between the presidents of China and Taiwan may have surprised many, but the sides first broached the subject about two years ago and the leaders had their legacies very much in mind.

For Chinese President Xi Jinping, the summit may not change the outcome of Taiwan’s presidential election in January which the island’s main opposition Democratic Progressive Party (DPP) is widely expected to win, two sources with ties to the Chinese leadership said. Anti-China sentiment is rising in Taiwan.

But longer term, Xi hopes to cement his place in China’s pantheon of great leaders if he is able eventually to lure the self-ruled democratic island, which Beijing claims as its own, back to the fold, the sources said.

“Xi is not thinking about just the present. It’s long term,” one source told Reuters, requesting anonymity due to the sensitivity of the issue.

“If Xi could eventually create a framework for reunification, he would be as great as, if not greater than Deng Xiaoping,” added the source, referring to China’s late paramount leader who negotiated Hong Kong’s 1997 return to Chinese rule.

Read more at Reuters

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