Archive for the ‘Topics’ Category

2
Mar

MDG

Last week, the IE School of International Relations hosted the first Online Speaker Series this year, From the MDGs to the Post 2015 Sustainable Development Agenda – An Inside View of the United Nations. We were joined for this online session by Mr. Vinicius Pinheiro, Deputy Director of the ILO Office for the United Nations as well as Ms. Shuo Xing, Associate Director of IE’s Career Management Center.

During the online session, Mr. Pinheiro spoke specifically about the United Nations Millennium Development Goals while also offering a view going forward of the post-2015 sustainable development agenda. During the roughly one hour session, he provided a backdrop to the MDGs including the factors leading up to their development, the multilateral landscape at the time, while also looking at the goals and milestones achieved.

The Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) are a set of eight initiatives agreed to by all the world’s countries and development institutions, with a united aim ranging from poverty reduction to lessening of HIV/AIDS by this year, 2015. Celebrating the arrival of the 2015 target date, the UN is now embarking on an ambitious new set of post-2015 development agenda. Included in the scope of this new agenda are a variety of social and economic concerns including job creation, healthcare and education initiatives, as well as a renewed focus on cities and the environment.

According to Mr. Pinheiro, this new agenda will require strong coordination at the international level as well as cooperation by regional governments in terms of policy implementation. During the question and answer portion of the talk, he addressed such issues such as sustainable development for developing nations in the wake of rapid economic growth as well as specific policy practices related to food development and agriculture.

Following this talk, Miss Shuo Xing spoke about career opportunities in the public sector including the United Nations Young Professionals Programme which has seen several MIR alumni go through its ranks.

This online session, including the Q&A portion, was recorded and can be viewed here.

 

Written by Tim Palmer, IE Associate Director of Admissions.  

17
Feb

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On March 6th IE will host Ms. Cecilia Malmström, European Commissioner for Trade, for a discussion with our students and faculty on the much debated Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP), and the trade agenda and priorities of Europe.

Since assuming office in November 2014 as the new Commissioner for Trade under the Juncker Commission Ms. Malmström has been leading the negotiations of the TTIP with the objective of reaching a balanced and reasonable agreement with the U.S. that respects Europe’s safety, health, social and data protection standards, and Europe’s cultural diversity.

Previously, Ms. Malmström served as European Commissioner for Home Affairs (2010-2014) and as Minister for EU Affairs in the Swedish Government (2006-2010). She was Vice-President of Folkpartiet (Swedish Liberal Party) from 2007 to 2010, Member of Folkpartiet Party Executive (2001-2010), and Member of the European Parliament (1999-2006).

For more information on the Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP) please visit this LINK.

 

The event will take place from 1.00pm to 2:30pm (Room S-105, Calle Serrano 105). Please, register here: https://clubs.ie.edu/iecampuslife/rsvp?id=200001878

30
Jan
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Arantza de Areilza, Dean of IE School of International Relations, interviews Danilo Türk, former President of the Republic of Slovenia, on the changing security landscape of Europe

9
Jan

After the attack on the French satirical weekly newspaper Charlie Hebdo that left 12 dead and five injured, Twitter comments are pouring in from around the world.

Many take the form of one of the magazine’s specialties, cartoons. Foreign Policy has compiled some of them here.

4
Jan

The last year was a bad one for international peace and security. Sure, there were bright spots in 2014. Colombia’s peace process looks hopeful. The last round of Iran’s nuclear talks was more successful than many think. Tunisia, though not yet out of the woods, showed the power of dialogue over violence. Afghanistan bucked its history and has, notwithstanding many challenges, a government of national unity. President Barack Obama’s restoration of diplomatic relations with Cuba can only be positive.

But for the most part, it has been a dispiriting year. Conflict is again on the rise after a major decrease following the end of the Cold War. Today’s wars kill and displace more people, and are harder to end than in years past.

The Arab world’s turmoil deepened: The Islamic State captured large swathes of Iraq and Syria, much of Gaza was destroyed again, Egypt turned toward authoritarianism and repression, and Libya and Yemen drifted toward civil war. In Africa, the world watched South Sudan’s leaders drive their new country into the ground. The optimism of 2013 faded in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC), Ebola ravaged parts of West Africa, and Boko Haram insurgents stepped up terrorist attacks in northern Nigeria. The international legal order was challenged with the annexation of Crimea by Russia, and war is back in Europe as fighting continues in eastern Ukraine.

So what do the last 12 months tell us is going wrong?

On a global level, increasing geopolitical competition appears, for the moment at least, to be leading to a less controlled, less predictable world. This is most obvious, of course, with regard to the relationship between Russia and the West. It’s not yet zero-sum: The two nations still work together on the Iran nuclear file, the threat of foreign terrorist fighters, and, for the most part, on African peacekeeping. But Russia’s policy in its neighborhood presents a real challenge, and its relationship with the United States and Europe has grown antagonistic.

China’s relations with its neighbors also remain tense and could lead to a crisis in the East or South China Seas. The struggle between Iran and Saudi Arabia shapes the contours of violence between Sunnis and Shiites across the Middle East. Major Sunni powers are themselves divided: The contest between the Saudis, Emiratis, and Egypt on the one hand, and Qatar and Turkey on the other, plays out across North Africa. Elsewhere on the African continent, powers jostle in Somalia and in South Sudan’s increasingly regionalized war; and the DRC has long been a venue for its neighbors’ competition over influence and resources.

Rivalry between major and regional powers is nothing new, of course. But hostility between big powers has stymied the U.N. Security Council on Ukraine and Syria — and leaves its most powerful members less time and political capital to invest on other crises. As power gets more diffuse, antagonism between regional powers matters more. Competition between powerful states increasingly lends a regional or international color to civil wars, rendering their resolution more complex. Read more…

By Jean-Marie Guéhenno: Jean-Marie Guéhenno is president and CEO of the Brussels-based International Crisis Group.

Published on January 2, 2015 in http://foreignpolicy.com

 

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