12
Oct

The MIR Family on Exchange in Paris

Written on October 12, 2016 by Waya Quiviger in Master in International Relations (MIR), News

 Image result for sciences po

Pursuing a Master in International Relations at IE in Madrid is more than getting exposed to a great variety of courses, acquiring hard and soft skills, and spending endless hours working as teams. The MIR opens so many more doors. It is all about #goingbeyond. Upon completion of 10 compulsory months in Madrid, you can add an exchange semester in Paris.

 

Always dreamt about living in the capital of France?

This is an opportunity that you should not miss. This year, Daniel Morales, Kiyeon Kim and myself were lucky enough to get accepted at Sciences Po Paris, and we are honoured to represent IE and the MIR. Parisian life is filled with lots of culture and museums, strolls through the beautiful French streets or along the Seine, red wine and good cheese.

 

Wondering what Sciences Po is all about?

Studying at a top university like Sciences Po enables people from the MIR family to specialise even more. While one of us is pursuing the IR branch, the other two of us are pursuing the Economic and Business branch, taking classes in digital business strategies, finance projects, accounting, doing business in emerging markets and more. These additional classes help us further enhance our skillset to ultimately transition into an international job-market.

 

What is the added value of Sciences Po?

Besides specializing an extra semester in the direction of your choice, Paris is a global networking hub. Seminars, corporate breakfasts and company presentations happen every week around campus. And, on Friday 30 September, Sciences Po students gathered at Maison de la Chimie in the heart of Paris for a Business Career Fair. Over 85 companies were present, covering diverse sectors like banking, consulting, luxury and retail. It was an opportunity for us to ask questions and make contacts, ultimately giving our CV and applying for internships or jobs.

 

Written by: Sophie Bik

MIR Students in Paris: Daniel Morales, Kiyeon Kim, and Sophie Bik

 

10
Oct

MIR Class of 2016/2017

Written on October 10, 2016 by Waya Quiviger in Master in International Relations (MIR), News

MIR 2016

 

On October 4th, the IE School of International Relations welcomed its 9th intake of the Master in International Relations. 18 nationalities were represented in a very diverse new class.

British Ambassador Simon Manley was the keynote speaker during the Opening Ceremony and his apt words on a Global Britain for a Global Century resonated well with the new intake.

 

 

3
Oct

Europe Needs Its Realist Past

Written on October 3, 2016 by Waya Quiviger in Europe, Foreign Policy, Security

As Europe’s troubles deepen and pose more of a threat to the vital interests of the U.S., Americans are recycling their tried and tested critiques of the European Union: It is too statist and bureaucratic. Its instincts are too protectionist. Its decision-making bodies are too slow and secretive. EU foreign policy is too naive, too feckless about defense and security. The problem with Europe, in a word, is that it is too European.

But the EU isn’t in trouble today because its leaders are “too European.” The EU is in trouble because its leadership isn’t European enough. It is time for the continent to return to the tradition of realist politics that gave rise to its modern union in the first place.

It is easy today to forget just how hardheaded the original architects of Europe’s postwar drive for integration actually were. Charles de Gaulle of France, Konrad Adenauer of West Germany and Alcide De Gasperi of Italy were conservative nationalists whose vision for Europe reflected the bitter experiences of two world wars and a failed peace.

In its origins, European unity was an unsentimental exercise in geopolitics. Germany and Italy saw it as a way to reintegrate into the world after the disaster of fascism. France saw a coalition with a defeated and partitioned Germany as a way to cement its power in Europe and to strengthen its global reach. All these governments saw European unity as a way to keep the Old World as independent as possible from both Moscow and Washington. “Europe will be your revenge,” Adenauer told de Gaulle after the humiliation of the Suez crisis in 1956, when the U.S. forced France and Britain to back down from a joint campaign with Israel against Egypt.

These leaders did not think that submerging their national histories and identities in a cosmopolitan, post-national Europe was either possible or desirable. They supported Europe because it seemed to be the best way forward for the peoples they led. For its part, the U.S. backed the project because a united Western Europe offered the best hope to stop communism in the short term and to prevent the recurrence of major European wars farther down the road. Read more…

 

 

27
Sep

Trkish President Recep Tayyip Erdoğan’s extra-legal roundup of scores of presumed supporters of the failed July 15 coup against his government is quickly taking its place in modern history alongside Stalin’s purges and China’s Cultural Revolution.

This — and Turkey’s demands that the U.S. turn over the cleric-in-exile Fethullah Gülen for trial on charges that include terrorism — further strains U.S.-Turkey relations. U.S. officials publicly stated that the spiral of repression weakens Erdoğan’s long-term security.

The arrest and detention of judges, mayors, teachers, military personnel, civil servants, journalists and political opponents deepens not only Turkey’s societal fault lines, but also global fault lines, separating Turkey from the West and bedeviling Western security policy for years to come. Turkey is one of just two Muslim-majority nations in the Middle East with a semblance of pro-Western democracy, making it pivotal to resolving the general crisis in the Middle East. Read more…

Hilton Root teaches public policy at George Mason University’s Schar School of Policy and Government, is an affiliated senior scholar at the Mercatus Center, and authored “Dynamics Among Nations: The Evolution of Legitimacy and Development in Modern States” (MIT Press).

Sept. 25, 2016

23
Sep

Near the beginning of President Barack Obama’s final speech to the United Nations General Assembly on Tuesday morning, he pointed out something really important about the world today: We are living through the best time in human history, but it feels to a lot of us like anything but.

“This is the paradox that defines our world today: A quarter century after the end of the Cold War, the world is by many measures less violent and more prosperous than ever before. And yet our societies are filled with uncertainty and unease and strife,” Obama said.

This isn’t just a one-off observation on his part. It actually speaks to something very fundamental, and underappreciated, about the nature of the world we live in. We have set up a series of institutions that order the world — ranging from NATO to the global free trade regime to the UN itself — and have helped make the world better for most people.

But not everyone. Some people have suffered tremendously from the way the world is ordered — and it’s helped create a broader sense of social and global crisis.

 Obama’s speech, then, is an implicit recognition that how this paradox gets resolved — if the real suffering of the few can be alleviated without sacrificing the gains of the many — will play a major role in shaping his how tenure in office is perceived. Read more…
 
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